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Walking-sticks

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SHERBRO

 

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The Shebro tribe is one of the indigenous tribes of Sierra Leone. It is a fishing tribe and their settlements were mainly by the sea.

The Shebro are known for their fishing skills and for lighting bonfires not only for the practicalities of night time fishing but also for sitting around to keep company with each other and tell stories.

Carved by Alpha Kargbo, Master Carver, Lakka, Western Peninsula, Sierra Leone. November 2013.

Sherbro Chief’s walking stick

 

 

Sherbro Chief’s walking stick

The Shebro tribe is one of the indigenous tribes of Sierra Leone. It is a fishing tribe and their settlements were mainly by the sea.

The Shebro are known for their fishing skills and for lighting bonfires not only for the practicalities of night time fishing but also for sitting around to keep company with each other and tell stories.

This walking stick is traditionally held by the chief and some important elders in the shebro tribe.

Made out of a hard rosewood wood it is heavy and strong.

It is carved showing a Shebro chief’s crown just below the handle.

It is decorated with two jeggie (sea shells) to make it more powerful.

It is used to ward off evil spirits and for protection against ju ju or evil people. it can even protect against an attack from a dangerous animal.

It can also be used to bring luck to the village.

The chief goes to the beach side as the small fishing boats are leaving the shore and conducts a ceremony. He points the stick at the water to bring the fish inside the water and to bring luck to the fishermen to catch them.

Carved by Alpha Kargbo, Master Carver, Lakka, Western Peninsula, Sierra Leone. November 2013.

LIMBA

 

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The Limba tribe is one of the indigenous tribes of sierra leone. It is a tribe of the bush which still has its own limba settlements deep inside the countryside.

The Limba are known for their foresting, farming and climbing skills. They are the only tribe that collects palm wine (poyo) directly from the very top of tall palm trees. A traditional Limba house is made entirely from natural materials from the jungle with a tall domed grass roof.

The Limba make children’s toys and musical instruments out of wood. In the evening two men play their xylophone like wooden drums and the women and children sing sweet acapella songs. One or two devils may come to dance for luck.

Limba Chief’s walking stick

 

 

 

Limba Chief’s walking stick

The Limba tribe is one of the indigenous tribes of Sierra Leone. It is a tribe of the bush which still has its own limba settlements deep inside the countryside.

The Limba are known for their foresting, farming and climbing skills. They are the only tribe that collects palm wine (poyo) directly from the very top of tall palm trees. A traditional limba house is made entirely from natural materials from the jungle with a tall domed grass roof. The Limba make children’s toys and musical instruments out of wood.in the evening two men play their xylophone like wooden drums and the women and children sing sweet acapella songs. One or two devils may come to dance for luck.

This walking stick is traditionally held by the chief and some important elders in the Limba tribe.

Made out of a hard rosewood wood it is heavy and strong.

It is carved with three sections. significantly at the top is the Limba chief’s wife just below the handle. In the middle is a hollowed out oblong which has a wooden ball inside it. This is the main source of the sticks magic powers. At the bottom there is a carving of the chief. The Limba chief’s wife is represented on the stick because she along with her husband presides over any limba court case with equal importance.

Once the carving is finished then it must be dressed in the traditional Limba way by a medicine man to make it powerful.

First the handle is painted with a traditional pattern. Then the chief’s wife is decorated with painted jewellery.

When it is dressed then it is blessed. Only then it has the full magical, mystical and protective potential.

It is used to ward off evil spirits and for protection against ju ju or evil people. It can even protect against an attack from a dangerous animal.

It is always present during any Limba court case dealt with by the chief and his wife.

It can also be used to bring luck to the village.

The chief goes to the farm side when any crop is being planted. He conducts a ceremony and waves the stick over the farm to increase the yield of rice, couscous or anything that is being sewn.

Carved by Alpha Kargbo, Master Carver, Lakka, Western Peninsula, Sierra Leone. November 2013.

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